Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Review: Scythe

Scythe Scythe by Neal Shusterman
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

This. Was. Great.

Mortality is dead. In a world where diseases are vanquished and people can "turn the corner" and have a newer, younger body, Scythes serve as population control. Gleaning people at random, or by statistics, or however they choose. Citra and Rowen are chosen as apprentices, something neither of them wants, which actually makes them perfect for the job.

I love the world building, I love how Neal shows that even in a utopia, there are still people who are human, who will find a way to push boundaries, and be evil. I found the idea of the "cloud" becoming an almost all powerful "Thunderhead." I am so curious to see where this goes. This series starter does wrap up the prominent plot line, but leaves things open for more in the larger "world." I'll come back to this one to finish.

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Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Review: Misunderstood: Why the Humble Rat May Be Your Best Pet Ever

Misunderstood: Why the Humble Rat May Be Your Best Pet Ever Misunderstood: Why the Humble Rat May Be Your Best Pet Ever by Rachel Toor
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Okay, maybe I can change my mind about rats. I still don't want one, I'll keep my cats, but if you do...I won't say eeewww.

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Wednesday, March 8, 2017

Review: To Stay Alive: Mary Ann Graves and the Tragic Journey of the Donner Party

To Stay Alive: Mary Ann Graves and the Tragic Journey of the Donner Party To Stay Alive: Mary Ann Graves and the Tragic Journey of the Donner Party by Skila Brown
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

The map in the front piece is wrong. St. Joseph is in the wrong place. There. Had to get that out of the way. It's on the wrong side of the state of Missouri.

I have a morbid curiosity about the Donner Party, like many people. This book in verse takes the point of view from Mary Ann Graves, the second oldest daughter of one family who joined with the Donner party on the way to California. We never know the things we will do to stay alive.

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Sunday, March 5, 2017

I made the paper!


One of my colleges at school mentioned my being on the Gateway Committee to our local paper, Palmyra Spectator.  Who knew it would lead to another article for the Quincy Herald Whig? Yes, I love to read. :)  I'm feeling a bit overwhelmed.


Wednesday, March 1, 2017

Review: The Female of the Species

The Female of the Species The Female of the Species by Mindy McGinnis
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

This book...crushed me. I read it in three sittings, but with a couple of weeks between each one. I had to stop and text a friend to make sure I could go on. I think this is one of the best books I've read in a long time. It's dark. It's deep. It's heartbreaking. It's worth every tear. It's something I am going to give to as many kids as I can. There are multi points of view, one boy and two girls. I feel like everyone should read this book.

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Wednesday, February 22, 2017

Review: The Nerdy and the Dirty

The Nerdy and the Dirty The Nerdy and the Dirty by B.T. Gottfred
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Every time I get annoyed and ready to stop reading because I don't really like Pen, Benedict takes over the next chapter and keeps me going. Pen is a drama girl, for all that she claims to be keeping silent. Benedict is so logical and truthful, it's painfully funny. Inside his head is Evil Benny, and Good Benny and then later Penis Benny, seriously, he's named all the voices in his head, and tells us just what they say. Snicker. Anyway--lots of ugly drama at the 3/4ths part that gets resolved, of course, happily, yeah! But the dedication is great, also. Make sure you read it!

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Review: Gap Life

Gap Life Gap Life by John Coy
My rating: 2 of 5 stars

Cray doesn't want to follow the path his father has chosen for him. Dad wants Cray to be a doctor, like him, and has all the pieces in place to make that happen. The announcement of a gap year, by Cray, does not go over well. Cray has even ignored a deadline to get into the college of his father's choice. So dad decides Cray must find a job, not an easy feat in early summer, pay rent at home, oh and...goodbye graduation car. He manages to get a job in a group home as a substitute overnight assistant. He comes to care for the people there, learning things about them and himself.

Cray has been coasting, doing everything that's expected of him, but in reality he has no plans for after high school graduation. He's adrift and if feels like he's rebelling against his dad, but has no real plan, and no intention of getting one. He hides from family, avoiding confrontation, by staying out all night, spending the nights at his friend's house before he gets the job. HIs job comes from a recommendation from Rayne, a girl he knew from school. He falls for Rayne, but she has a boyfriend and real plans of her own to travel in the fall. Cray attaches himself to her but still doesn't have any new ideas, he just modifies hers. So--all in all--Cray does grow, a tiny bit, thanks to his job, but he still has a long way to go. I guess that is real life, but I wanted more making this book just "meh" for me.

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