Wednesday, June 10, 2015

If you like Percy Jackson...


I want this to be a series. I want more of this story, I want to see/read Zephyr coming into her powers as Nyx, to see if she can fully control them, and see if she can find love unlike other Harpies.  The promise is there, even though the novel did wrap up nicely. It’s well paced, and the romance is downplayed. With the cover a mysterious bunch of black feathers, the boys can read this one without feeling uncomfortable.  



Rick Riordan’s Percy Jackson started a trend in young adult novels using ancient Greek mythology with a modern day setting that I like very much. It’s a great way to interest today’s teens in ancient literature and maybe help their ACT/SAT scores in a sneaky way. The Goddess Test is another book series in this vein; that will appeal to teen girls with its romance, love triangle, drama, and mystery elements. I can think of several students I will hand this to, this fall, when school resumes. Though I needed the reference list at the end to figure out who was who in the pantheon, because of the modern names, and not quite enough fleshing out of some of the minor characters—perhaps their namesakes will be more obvious in later novels. 

Kate is facing the end of her world as she fights the inevitability of her mother’s death from cancer. When Ava, a classmate, dies before Kate’s eyes and she has the chance to change the incident she makes a rash promise to Henry, a handsome young man who appears to magic it all away. Kate will live with Henry for six months of the year for the rest of her life. Henry is handsome, mysterious, powerful, and reminds me of the best of Edward, without the vampire part. 


When Phoebe's mom returns from Greece with a new husband and moves them to an island in the Aegean, Phoebe's plans for her senior year and track season are ancient history. Now she must attend the uber exclusive academy, where admission depends on pedigree, namely, ancestry from Zeus, Hera, and other Greek gods. That's right, they're real, not myth, and their teen descendants are like the classical heroes: supersmart and super beautiful with a few superpowers. And now they're on her track team! Armed only with her Nikes and the will to win, Phoebe races to find her place among the gods. (from Goodreads.com)

These are fairly light reads, but fun, and good for track girls.  I liked the first one better than the second, and Tera Lynne Childs has also tackled Medusa and her sisters in Medusa Girls.